Definition

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) states that assistive technology (AT) must be considered for every child having an individualized education program (IEP). Under IDEA, AT can be special education (specially designed instruction), a related service, or supplementary aides and services so it can appear in the IEP in a variety of ways. While AT is applicable to persons of all ages and in all environments, in education the key questions to ask are, "What is it that the student needs to do in the educational program that he/she isn't able to do because of the disability?" and secondly, "Are there any AT devices or services that might be enable the child to meet the goal?" The questions are easy. Getting to the answers is more challenging.

Assistive technology (AT) is defined as "any item, piece of equipment, or product system, whether acquired commercially off the shelf, modified, or customized, that is used to increase, maintain, or improve the functional capabilities of a student with a disability". Devices can range from as simple as a pencil grip or fat crayon to a complex communication device.

An AT service is any service that directly assists a student with a disability with the assessment selection, acquisition, or use of an assistive technology device. Services include training for teachers, paraprofessionals, the students, and others who might need to use the device in the student's environment including the parents where appropriate.

Consider Assistive Technology

  • Consideration is meant to be accomplished within the context of the IEP meeting.
  • AT consideration is meant to be short, accomplished in approximately 20 minutes or less
  • At least one member of the IEP team should be knowledgeable about AT

If the IEP team cannot reach consensus or if the team decides that they lack the expertise to have a thoughtful discussion about AT, an AT consultation should be triggered. The Idaho Assistive Technology Project (IATP) can provide AT consultations at no charge to schools and families.

 


Request a School Based Service

  1. Assistive Technology Inquiry
    To ask an AT related question,please contact the IDAHO SESTA HELP DESK.
  2. Apply to have a School Based Consultation completed.
    Use the Student Consultation Application to request an AT Consultation for a specific student. After the consultation, you will receive a written report detailing AT ideas specific to the student.
  3. Formal Training on Assistive Technology
    Use the Formal Training on AT Request Form to request formal training for your small or large group of teachers and professionals. Formal training helps build and support AT team growth in your district.
  4. Borrow a piece of equipment for trial with a student
    Find out more
  5. Request a free computer for your rural resource room or student
    Find out more
  6. Sign up to attend the next Tools for Life conference
    Find out more

 

IATP Consultation

An Assistive Technology Practitioner (ATP) credentialed through RESNA (Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America) or other assistive technology certificate/certification program, will perform the AT assessment. RESNA ATPs have an educational background in occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech-language pathology, special education, or rehabilitation; ongoing work experience (.25 to .50 FTE) of direct AT consumer-related services; have passed a rigorous exam on all areas of AT; and have annual continuing education on AT.

IATP Consultation Procedure

  • Fill out an online AT consultation application
  • An ATP will be assigned to the consultation
  • The ATP will follow the Fundamental Assessment Process utilizing a team approach
  • The ATP looks at the student, environment, and tasks through observation, review of records, and input from Individualized Education Program (IEP) team members
  • Through a feature-matching process, potential AT devices and software are identified and tried with the student
  • The continuum of devices and software are considered to ensure cost effectiveness and identification of the most appropriate device
  • A written report will be provided, within two or three weeks of the school visit, for the IEP team to use as one tool in making AT decisions

It is important to note, that this report does not serve, through information sharing or implication, as the consideration process for assistive technology. It is simply part of the data offered to the IEP team as they complete their AT consideration process. We are not part of the IEP team.

Assistive Device Demonstration and Lending

Assistive technology demonstration and lending centers are located across the state of Idaho. Each center includes computer access demonstration stations for children and adults, as well as equipment for persons with sensory impairments, cognitive impairments, and physical disabilities, which include aids for recreational activities, daily living, educational, vocational and personal care aids. All equipment available to borrow or see a demonstration of is listed on the Idaho.At4All website. Each Resource Center is prepared to take questions about assistive technology needs and will either send out information or connect the consumer with the appropriate person to help them out. Learn more about the Resource Centers by contacting either the IATP's main office at 1-800-432-8324 or by contacting each center directly.


Computer Distribution Program

Computers are available for Idaho students with disabilities, grades K thru 12 who have an Individualized Education Plan (IEP). Computers are also available for Idaho's rural school districts for use in resource rooms. Visit the Computer Distribution Program home-page to find out more information about the program


Tools for Life Fair

Tools for Life Fairs are for students with disabilities and anyone who offers support as they transition from high school to college or work. The event includes presentations about secondary transition and assistive technology. Idaho Educators, Post Secondary Educators, therapists, counselors, service providers, job developers, and other rehabilitation specialists, and especially secondary students with disabilities and their families are encouraged to attend. Visit the Tools Fair page to learn more about and register for the conference.


Trainings

Featured Training

Learn about Free/low-cost Reading and Writing tools for iPad, Chromebook, and PC!

The brief 25 minute video covers text-to-speech and speech-to-text tools for student computing devices. Click here to view the powerpoint to find links to the products demonstrated. Presentation Slides 1 per page (PDF); Presentation Slides 3 per page (PDF)

 

 

All Trainings

Presenter: Dan Dyer, Training Coordinator, Idaho Assistive Technology Project
Description: This interactive training shows what the Chromebook is and can do. View the presentation if you want to learn how Chromebooks can be used as a tool in your general, special, and assistive technology supported classroom.
Interactive Version of the presentation: View here
Captioned Version: View here

Description: Apple Portable Devices, Apps, and Management: Using the iPad/iPod/iPhone in a School, Work, or Retirement Setting - Five-Part Webinar Series

Presenter: Dan Dyer, Assertive Technology Project

View this webinar here .

Description: The computer is perhaps the most revolutionary tool to provide access to information since the invention of the printing press. A computer can provide access to libraries of books and information for individuals who have a print disability - who are either blind, have a visual impairment or are not able to physically hold a book. A computer also reads text for those individuals who have a print disability such as dyslexia. A computer can provide access to family and friends for individuals who have a speech disability - those individuals whose speech is very hard to understand. A computer can provide a way for individuals to compose who cannot write by hand - those individuals who either cannot hold a pencil/pen, who do not have the physical strength to exert enough pressure to make marks on paper, or have tremoring in their hands that make handwriting extremely difficult.

Presenter: Kathy Griffin Assistive Technology Professional
Online Training Link / Transcript

Description: Have you ever had a child/student who tantrums, bites, or hits? Or maybe you have a child/student who can't seem to finish a task without you standing/sitting right there beside him/her. Well….maybe visual schedules can help. What are they? How do I get them in my classroom? Or…maybe you know what they are, but just can't figure out how to implement them? Tune in to this webinar! Walk away with some new tools for your classroom, home, or work environment.

Presenter: Anne Kuhlmeier, M.A., CCC, ATP Speech/Language Pathologist

Online Training link / Transcript

Students with learning disabilities make up approximately 50% of the special education population, but are sometimes the least likely to utilize assistive technology. There is much confusion around if and when we should compensate for a learning disability. If we give a student with a learning disability easy access to the curriculum through audio or audio/visual means, will this slow down a student’s progress in reading? How much time and effort should be put into remediating reading versus compensating for it? We will look at the emerging research on this subject.

Online Training link
Handout link
Script link

Do you have students who cannot physically manipulate math materials? Do you have students struggling with geometry or other math concepts? In his work with the Idaho Assistive Technology Project providing assistive technology assessments and trainings to schools, Michael Mann, PT, ATP, has helped teams find solutions for these students. This web-based training, Assistive Technology for Math , is Mike’s effort to share these resources with teachers, students and families.

Click here to view the presentation.

A text transcript of this presentation is available by clicking here.

This online training discusses age-appropriate materials for secondary students with significant disabilities. This training grew out of a need to find more appropriate materials for a 16-year-old who has cerebral palsy and autism.This training highlights the fact that assistive technology and educational technology are overlapping more and more with producers of AT helping to create educational materials in accessible formats and that are also age-appropriate.
Presenter: Nora Jehn- Training Coordinator at the Idaho Assistive Technology Project- CDHD/University of Idaho)
Online Training Link
Online Training in CC version
Handout Link
Script Link

Description: An introduction to the variety of Google services, products, and their accessibility. Topics include Google services, Google products, and alternative tools and strategies for accessing both.

Presenter: Laine Amoureux
Recording: Link to view All Things Google video (closed captions)

The computer is perhaps the most revolutionary tool to provide access to information since the invention of the printing press. A computer can provide access to libraries of books and information for individuals who have a print disability - who are either blind, have a visual impairment or are not able to physically hold a book. A computer also reads text for those individuals who have a print disability such as dyslexia. A computer can provide access to family and friends for individuals who have a speech disability - those individuals whose speech is very hard to understand. A computer can provide a way for individuals to compose who cannot write by hand - those individuals who either cannot hold a pencil/pen, who do not have the physical strength to exert enough pressure to make marks on paper, or have tremoring in their hands that make handwriting extremely difficult.

Presenter: Kathy Griffin Assistive Technology Professional
Online Training Link / Transcript

This presentation covers Assistive Technology for Deaf/Hard of Hearing (DHH), Blind/Low Vision (BLV), and Deaf/Blind (DB).

Presenter: Dan Dyer -Idaho Center for Assistive Technology
Dan Dyer is the AT Library Coordinator at the Idaho Center for Assistive Technology providing assistive technology technical assistance, assessment, and training. Dan has worked for two years as a home technician for adults with disabilities. He spent three years working for the Idaho Center for Disabilities and Human development before joining the Idaho Center for Assistive Technology. Dan holds a Certificate in Assistive Technology Applications from California State University at Northridge and a bachelor's degree from the University of Idaho.
Online Training link /Transcript

Presented by Stephanie Ekis, MS CCC-SLP
View Webinar

This webinar focuses on creating inclusive classroom environments for students struggling with speech and language. Learn how to select vocabulary useful to the natural environment and how to implement that vocabulary and foster rich communication.

Presenter: Anne Kuhlmeier, M.A., CCC, ATP, Speech/Language Pathologist
Online Training Link

View the webinar to learn how to:

  • Set positioning and mobility goals with your child or student,
  • Evaluate and match assistive technology to their needs,
  • Lean about commonly used positioning and mobility assistive technology,
  • Review examples of real client stories.

PC version: View here

Presenter: Kathie LaFortune, PT, PCS, ATP

iPad version: Begin by downloading iSpring Player app for iPad in the app store. Once you have installed iSpring player app, view the presentation in your iPad Safari browser.

The computer is perhaps the most revolutionary tool to provide access to information since the invention of the printing press. A computer can provide access to libraries of books and information for individuals who have a print disability - who are either blind, have a visual impairment or are not able to physically hold a book. A computer also reads text for those individuals who have a print disability such as dyslexia. A computer can provide access to family and friends for individuals who have a speech disability - those individuals whose speech is very hard to understand. A computer can provide a way for individuals to compose who cannot write by hand - those individuals who either cannot hold a pencil/pen, who do not have the physical strength to exert enough pressure to make marks on paper, or have tremoring in their hands that make handwriting extremely difficult.

Presenter: Kathy Griffin Assistive Technology Professional
Online Training Link / Transcript

The purpose of the webinar is to provide you with a general introduction to assistive technology devices and services, to motivate you to embrace technology and understand how it can help you plan for the diversity in your classrooms, and to identify some tools for mobility, communication, computer access, and learning.

Presenter: Ron Seiler, Former Director of Idaho Assistive Technology Project at CDHD/University of Idaho

Online Training Link

Assistive Technology is More than Computers explains the wide variety of AT options and emphasizes the importance of considering low tech tools as well as high tech devices.
Presented by: Wisconsin Assistive Technology Initiative
Click here to open the video in Windows Media Player for Closed Captioned version

Presented by: Penny Reed, Ph.D., from the Wisconsin Assistive Technology Initiative
Click here to open the video in Windows Media Player for Closed Captioned version

Introduction to Assistive Technology for New Teachers
Date Presented: January 9, 2013
Presented by: The Idaho Assistive Technology Project and Dan Dyer
Handouts: Presentation slides (PDF) Presentation Notes (PDF)
Recording: Link to Webinar

The IEP Team & AT Decisions models the team-based decision-making process to make effective decisions about AT.
Presented by:Wisconsin Assistive Technology Initiative
Click here to open the video in Windows Media Player for Closed Captioned version

Description Two apps for iPad, Prizmo and ClaroPDF, are reviewed to show how worksheets can be photographed, read aloud to a student, and then allow the student to input his/her responses by typing or using speech-to-text.

Presented by: Dan Dyer, Idaho Assistive Technology Project
View Presentation

Description Many Schools adopted the iPad because Apple was the early leader in accessibility and learning apps. Now many schools and parents are asking us about Google’s Android, Barnes & Noble Nook, and Amazon’s Kindle apps due to the lower cost of these devices. In the next hour we will look at some of the most popular iPad apps and put them head-to-head with Android apps that do the same thing.

Handouts: http://www.livebinders.com/media/get/MTA3OTg1MDQ=
Presented by: Mike Mann, MS, ATP
View Webinar

 


Resource Links

  • MyStudyBar: MyStudyBar is a tool which helps overcome problems that students commonly experience with studying, reading and writing. The tool consists of a set of portable open source and freeware applications, assembled into one convenient package.
  • Read Write Think: The Student Interactives on this site are very good. They are savable, printable, and provide solid writing activities at just the right level of difficulty. Visit the teacher, parent and after school tab for more ideas.
  • Aim Explorer: Determine the reading preferences that your students have (font size, font color, highlighting preference, text-to-speech preference, etc...) using Aim Explorer.
  • Zac Browser: Free internet browser for children.
  • Camera Mouse: Turn any webcam into a free head-tracking device. Simply move your head and the mouse will follow.
  • Ginger Software: Writing coach with spelling and grammar checker.
  • Steady Mouse: Download this free software for stabilization of mouse movement. Use the icon targeting feature to help your student find and click on links and icons.
  • Tar Heel Reader: Includes many basic books that highlight and read out loud for free. Type a subject that interests you into the search bar, like “big trucks” or “Iron Man”. If you go to the Write a Book section, you can write your own talking picture books on any subject and upload them for sharing and digital publishing.
  • Free Natural Reader: Get the free download of Free Natural Reader and install it to your computer to have text read aloud. Use it for reading by cut and paste into the program, or shrink it to Floating Bar mode to read anything on the internet.
  • Google Drive: Free online storage and document creation. Use this service to create and distribute online quizzes. Working with inaccessible files? Upload them and run Google’s free Optical Character recognition on them.
  • Google Chrome: Google Chrome is a free internet browser similar to Internet Explorer. Once installed on your computer, you can install the following free add-on’s to Chrome:

Many companies make their software available for free, or offer customers a free trial period with it. Listed below are a few of these programs that you may find useful. To submit a link to be added to this list, please contact us.

Math and Science
  • InspireData 30 day free trial. InspireData applies the proven strategies of visual learning to data literacy, inspiring students grades 4-12 to discover meaning as they collect and explore data in a dynamic inquiry process.
Reference
  • Cosmeo 30 day free trial. Cosmeo brings together a deep video encyclopedia, interactive games, reference content, and tutorials to help kids stay engaged in learning.
Literacy
  • Free Graphic Organizers: Graphic organizers provide a way for students to brainstorm and organize their writing.
  • Kidspiration: Created for K-5 learners, Kidspiration provides a visual way to help students learn to think, write and comprehend. Students build graphic organizers by combining pictures, text and spoken words to represent thoughts and information.
  • Inspiration: Inspiration is a tool for students grade 6 to adult to plan, research and complete projects successfully.
  • Kurzweil 3000: Kurzweil 3000 software can access virtually any information, whether it is printed, electronic, or on the Web. Because Kurzweil 3000 is also content independent, teachers in elementary schools, middle schools, high schools and colleges alike use it to help students succeed in the classroom regardless of curriculum or lesson plan.
  • TestTalker: TestTalker is a software solution designed to help individuals be more successful with test taking, worksheet completion, and study materials. It also aids completion of electronic forms. TestTalker provides a computerized version of a test, worksheet, or other form that can talk.
  • Wordbar: For a 30 day free trial call toll-free:1 866 33 CRICK (27425). Wordbar is a toolbar that sits along the bottom of your screen. You can click on words and phrases in Wordbar to send them to your word processor.
  • Wynn Literacy Software for Reading and Writing By using a bi-modal approach - simultaneous highlighting of the text as it is spoken - WYNN transforms printed text into understandable information that benefits readers of all ages including English Language Learners (ELL), struggling readers and children with ADD (attention deficit disorder) or ADHD (attention deficit hyperactive disorder).
  • Bridging Apps Informational website that lists many free educational apps. Use the site's interactive tool to search for apps related to a specific topic.
  • Sono Flex Lite Communication App by AAC Company Tobii.
  • Dragon Dictation Older iPads do not natively support speech recognition.
  • iBooks This enables students to make notes within the text of books using their voice. You can purchase and use Apple's interactive iTextbooks with it. Students can use it to access teacher created PDFs.
  • Google Translate Take a picture of a piece of paper and have the app read the text contained in the picture aloud to you.

Key:

Apple Apps below are Green
Android Apps below are Yellow
Nook Apps below are Blue
Kindle Apps below are Gray
Multi-platform apps below are multi colored.

Proloquo2Go [Apple only, $219] is the most popular app for non-verbal communication. 4 stars.

Aacorn [Apple only, $190/$80 on sale] New for children with autism; uses visual word trees for sentence building that eliminates most of the setup and programming, but lacks visual impairment and fine mortor settings. 4 stars.

Alexic om AAC [Android/Apple, FREE] Plug-in “elements” cost $19.99 ea. for specialized page sets. Picture-based AAC. 3 stars.

AvAz Pro [Android/Apple,$150; Lite Version FREE] Picture-based AAC for autism, fully programmable. 4 stars. Next version will have word-order support!!

JAB talk [Android/Nook, FREE] Has appropriate images for older kids and adults. 4 stars.

AAC Speech Communicator [Android/Kindle, FREE] Works on Android and Kindle devices. 3.5 stars.

Sono Flex Lite [Apple, FREE] Communication App by AAC Company Tobii. Visit the website here.

Scene and Heard Lite [Apple, FREE] Visual Scene AAC communication app. Visit the website here.

Voice Dream Reader [Apple only, $9.99] Voted the single best app on AppleVis. 4.5 stars.

Voice Dream Writer [Apple only, $9.99] NEW! New features provide TTS while writing, audible spelling errors, phonetic and meaning dictionaries, content vs. detail proofreading, and accessible organization support for longer documents. Not rated.

Eloquence TTS [Android only, $19.99] Gives voice access to Android OS and apps. 4.4 stars.

Nook HD now has text-to-speech. It uses Pico FREE voices from Svox. You can turn it on in the full settings menu, under Applications and Reader. TTS may be a check box about half way down the page. Or it may say: "Enable accessibility–Currently in BETA.” When you start a book, it should start reading automatically; however you may need to touch the screen to prompt it to start. Reviews of the voice are not positive. The Bookstore app is not accessible.

Only the Kindle Keyboard 3G and Kindle Fire have TTS capability. Basic models have no speaker or audio port. They use Ivona FREE voices. The best Functionality for BVI may be to use the Kindle or Nook app on an iPad.

iWordQ [Apple only, $28.99] 3 TTS reading modes for reading different difficulty-levels; word prediction; flexible spelling, visual settings. 4+ stars.

iReadWrite [Apple only, $19.99] Adds 2 dictionaries (standard and picture supported) to the features listed for iWordQ, superior word-prediction, but TTS has just one mode. 4+ stars.

Gin ger [Android/Apple, FREE] Keyboard app with spelling, grammar check, word prediction, TTS, visual setting support, and built in tutorials. “Swype” typing on Android only. 4.2 stars.

FBReader [Android, FREE] by geometerplus with the TTS+ Plugin [Android, FREE] by Hyperonics adds Acapella and free voices to the popular eBook reader. Read by sentences, paragraph, or continuously. 4.5 stars.

Go ogl e D rive [Android/Apple/Nook/Kindle, FREE] TTS, word-prediction, dictionary support, and more - but requires plug-in downloads to set up. Once enabled, you can create, edit, and send docs from any device. Complexity may be a problem for some users. 4.3 stars.

iBooks [Apple, FREE] This enables students to make notes within the text of books using their voice. You can purchase and use Apple's interactive iTextbooks with it. Students can use it to access teacher created PDFs. Visit the website here

Google Translate [Android, FREE] Take a picture of a piece of paper and have the app read the text contained in the picture aloud to you. Visit the website here

App Writer or Prizmo [Apple, $10- $20] Take a picture of a piece of paper and have the App read the text contained in it aloud and provide additional supports such as word-prediction. 

Apple iOS provides strong dictation capability in any app that brings up the keyboard. It also makes calls, texts, emails, appointments, and reminders; sets alarms, opens apps and web pages, etc. by voice. There is some improvement in quality when you wear an ear-bud mic or Bluetooth headset. * Apple’s Siri gives voice control of some-but not all-OS functions, searching, and calling. Turn Siri on in the settings app and assign permissions to get the most from it.

Android OS provides simple dictation in any app that brings up the keyboard, but is more suited to text fields, text messages, and email . The commands for inserting characters and formatting are limited to basic punctuation and paragraph breaks. Integrates Swype and Dragon/Nuance keyboards seamlessly, an advantage Apple does not have, but you have to purchase and install them.

Google Now virtual assistant is different from Siri – way better at searching, but harder to set-up voice control. If you enable additional permissions in the settings, it does more. First enable “offline speech recognition.” Go into Accounts & Privacy settings in the main settings app to enable location, history, reporting, web history, and “contact recognition” for Google Now. To enable reminders, open the Notifications settings and enable “show updates from Google Now”. Open “Language & Input” settings to enable TTS speech output. Open the settings next to the Google TTS engine and tap “install voice data”. This gives you access to high-quality voices. With the above settings, Google Now can do anything Siri can.

For better dictation, Dicta droid [Android/Kindle, $3.99] provides full professional Dictaphone capability, audio note taking, and can be used as a session recorder for musicians. Attorneys use this. 4.5 stars.

For better and faster voice control,try Utter! Beta [Android, FREE]. It gives voice access to settings and apps without interfering with Google Now. 4 stars.

When using the Go ogl e A pp [Android/Apple/Nook/Kindle, FREE] on any device that has a microphone, you can say “OK Google” to wake up voice search capability - after giving it access to the microphone. 4.5 stars.

Dictation on Nook and Kindle (if it has a microphone) is the same as for Android. You can dictate on your Kindle (to a PC) with Dragon Rem ote Microphone [Android/Kindle, FREE], or purchase the Nuan ce Sw ype keyboard [Android/Nook/Kindle, $3.99] and install it for dictation when the keyboard is active. 2.5 and 4 stars respectively.

Dragon Dictation [Apple, FREE] Older iPads do not natively support speech recognition. Download this app to fill the gap. 

*Remember – All current devices require connection to Wi-Fi for dictation. Offline speech recognition is usually either limited or disabled.

Livescribe + [Apple, FREE] Gives real-time notetaking via iOS device with recorded audio that is time-stamped. This reduces study time enormously, but requires purchase of the Livescribe Smart Pen, which costs $150-$200. The app converts handwriting to print text and opens on any device that has internet access. 3 stars.

Notability [Apple, $2.99] and Pear Note [Apple, FREE] take written notes with audio, but not time stamped. They share between Apple mobile and PC platforms or email. 4 and 3.5 stars respectively.

Access Note [Android FREE/Apple, $2.99] is for BVI and uses the Talkback TTS or VoiceOver. It time-stamps written notes with the audio recording, but reviews are mixed due to accidental loss of notes from unintended button presses.

Audio Note [Android/Apple, 9.99] is for BVI and TTS users. 3.5 stars Android, 4 on iOS.

Ev er no te [Android/Apple/Nook/Kindle, FREE] Works on any platform that can access internet. It also takes audio with your written notes and opens on any device. Evernote can sync with the Livescribe Echo smart pen ($120) via PC, or with the Livescribe Sky (Wi-Fi) smart pen($170) over the cloud for access on anything. When you use Evernote with a smart pen, the notes are time-stamped which makes reviewing audio notes super-fast. No handwriting to text. 4+ stars.

The best app for staying on-track depends on why you need it. Many students prefer a paper notepad, or use the electronic notes app in their device, or ask the virtual assistant to schedule reminders and alarms. Some students use the camera to photograph assignments from the board or handouts. Others dictate the posted assignment into notes.

Lazy or forgetful: if this is your problem, Carrot To Do Talking Task List [Apple, $2.99] might be for you. When you check off your tasks on time, Carrot is your best friend. When you fall behind it gradually turns into a sadistic virtual slave - driver. More of a game than a schedule, it appeals to students who like gaming. With 10,000+ user votes, it is rated an impressive 5/5 stars.

Visual Schedule Planner [Apple, $14.99] gets high marks when students need picture support. Choose Month, Week, or Day tabs and divide the day into Morning, Afternoon, and Evening tasks. Keep notes on the day; print a day schedule, and store sound, video, and photos where you can find them for step-by-step help. 4 stars.

Homework [Android, FREE] Well-liked by general education students and is more visual than other choices, but not ideal for kids with reading difficulty. 4.4 stars.

The best math problem solvers are still on web pages, e.g. https://mathway.com/ and www.webmath.com/, but apps for math problem help are very popular.

yHomework Math Solver [Android/Apple, FREE] is a stand-alone app that is especially helpful for fractions and Algebra, and gives step-by step explanations. 4+ stars.

Photo Math [Android/Apple, FREE] is better for students with writing and typing difficulty, but only rates 3.5 stars with users. It uses the camera to capture math problems and provides solutions if the picture clarity is acceptable.

Cy math [Android/Apple, FREE] is an app that just opens the webpage on your device, but has a lot more versatility and crunching power than any stand-alone app. You can access it on any device that can access the web. An impressive 4.7 stars!

SoundAmpR [Apple only, $4.99] is the most popular app for amplifying conversations. 4 stars.

Hearing Aid with Replay [Android/Kindle, $3.99] is comparable; repeat a missed sentence-great for watching TV. 3 stars.

Doodle Buddy [Apple only, FREE] Great for kids, easy to use, variety of background wallpapers, stamping mode. 3.5 stars.

Markers [Android only, FREE] Kids love it, bold colors. 4.1 stars.

Dra wing Pad [Android/Nook/Kindle, $1.99] 4.5 stars.

http://www.gatfl.gatech.edu/index.php Georgia Tech Tools for Life
http://appcrawlr.com/ AppCrawlr App Discovery Engine
http://www.applevis.com/apps Best Apple apps for BVI
http://www.androidaccess.net/ Best Android apps for BVI

Share your resource links

Do you have a resource that you'd like to share with us?  Please contact Dan Dyer at: dyer@uidaho.edu


Contact Us

Janice Carson
Director and AEM State Lead
Idaho Assistive Technology Project
University of Idaho Center on Disabilities and Human Development
1187 Alturas Drive, Moscow, ID 83843
800-432-8324
janicec@uidaho.edu

Dan Dyer
Education Coordinator
Idaho Assistive Technology
Resource Center - Coeur d'Alene
1031 N. Academic Way, Room 130D, Coeur d'Alene, ID 83814
208-292-1406
dyer@uidaho.edu

sde Idaho Assistive Technology Project
Center on Disabilities and Human Development
1187 Alturas Dr.
Moscow, ID 83843